ton crocodile

In case you didn’t get a gander at this big boy over the weekend, I thought I would let you see it.  This is a crocodile weighing 2, 370 pounds and is 21 feet long!  The big bully was seen taking down a water buffalo and is suspected of eating a local fisherman that has been missing since July.  It was captured in a village of about 37,000 people (sounds like a city to me) in the Phillipines.  The people are planning to make it the star of an ecotourism park (“tourism to exotic or threatened ecosystems to observe wildlife or to help preserve nature” as defined by the Princeton University).

Even though they captured Lolong, as it has been named, there is still another even bigger one still out in the marsh around the village, and the people have been told not to go into the marshes at night.  Uh, hello?  I don’t think you need to tell me that.  As a matter of fact, I think I would just as soon die of dehydration as venture into the jaws of something like this.

largest reptile: saltwater crocodile

Back in 2005 another big croc was captured in Uganda.  It had dined on about 83 of the local people over two decades: fisherman and villagers getting water.  The dining place of this particular croc was dubbed “Butcher.”  Crocodiles don’t chew their food, so the victim is chomped and swallowed, chomped and swallowed…

And here is where the great opportunities comes into play.  Those crocs may look like lazy buggers with nothing more to do than lollygag in the water, but, in fact, are great opportunists.

potential food

Waiting in the marsh to eat a fishermanfood delicacy sounds like it might be worth the wait.  Let the food come to you.

For the lucky people that do capture those huge, ton man-eaters, there are all kinds of opportunities awaiting them.  The ecosystem park for starters.  Can you imagine how many people could be fed with a haul that big at some fancy-shmancy restaurant that serves up delicacies such as Curried Crocodile?  Or how about this recipe?

Crocodile Recipe

Crocodile with mango & basil sauce

300g crocodile meat, cut into thin slices
30g peanut oil
20g basil leaves
20g parsley
5g garlic, chopped
20ml white wine vinegar
200ml olive oil
1 mango, stone removed and peeled
salt & pepper to taste

Heat peanut oil in a frying pan, saute seasoned crocodile pieces for about three minutes then set aside and keep warm. Blend basil, garlic, parsley, vinegar and olive oil in a food processor until smooth, set aside. Slice mango thinly and arrange on plate. Place crocodile slices in the centre, drizzle basil sauce around the plate and garnish with fresh herbs.

Personally, I think they should make Lolong into some nice boots or purses or belts or whatever else crocodile skin is used to make.  Those things would last a long, long time and make the villagers some good money as well.

mens black crocodile boots
light brown crocodile purse

Great opportunities come in all size of packages to give us all kinds of ideas.  Mine came in a small computer monitor with a picture of a big ol’ croc.

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